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Month: October 2016

Enable Deduplication on Windows 10

Enable Deduplication on Windows 10

Warning
Because of many comments about the fact that after upgrading your Windows 10 computer to a new version (most of the time Insiders release), deduplication features are not working and so your deduplicated volumes and data are not accessible anymore. Let me remind you that, it is a non-Microsoft supported deduplication package which is built for a specific version of Windows 10 based on Windows Server 2016 native features. It means that I cannot create a specific Windows 10 build version of this package without having the Windows Server 2016 corresponding build.
Use this package at your own risks, and note that I am not responsible for any data loss/business loss, device corruption or any other type of loss due to the use of this package.

Build 14393.0

Hello, I was very busy these last few months and I got no time to work on this blog… Anyway, I made the new Dedup Package for build 14393.0 that I tested on my W10 14393.187 and it is fully functional. You can find this package directly from here (md5: 48cdbfddcc4a2266950ad93a6cfe2b9f).As always, to install deduplication feature on your Windows 10 computer, you will just need to launch install.cmd file as administrator. Enjoy.

Build 14300.1000

You will find the deduplication package for build 14300.1000 here (md5 : 6a7ba5b2d6353cc42ff2c001894f64b4). As usual now, to install deduplication feature on your Windows 10 computer, you will just need to launch install.cmd file as administrator. For information, this package is only working for x64 platform (don’t forget to open x64 version of PowerShell to access deduplication cmdlets).

Note that I can only build this package if I have the linked Windows Server 2016 build, so if you need a special package for a build of Windows 10 contacts me with the link or the .iso of the appropriate Windows Server 2016 build.

Build 14291.1001

You will find the deduplication package for build 14291.1001 here (md5 : b150cd2fe60e314e24cedeafeb6f1f42). To install deduplication feature on your Windows 10 computer, you will just need to launch install.cmd file as administrator.

Build 10586

You will find the new package based on Windows Server 2016 TP4 build 10586 here (md5 : 21251c030d3c1a5572bd0f12473c623c). To install deduplication feature on your Windows 10 computer, you will just have to launch install.cmd file as administrator and voila!

You don’t need anymore to be part of Microsoft Insider Program for this build. So just skip text above until PS module usage here. If you want more information about available cmdlets and usage, you can read my article here.

Build 10514

Until now if you wanted to make use of deduplication on your Windows client operating system, especially on Windows 8.1 you had to reuse deduplication module of Windows Server 2012. But as you probably know, Windows 10 still does not provide this functionality by native, and the old module used for Windows 8.1 is not compatible… So perhaps you still have not migrated to Windows 10 because of this ?! Well, I’m glad to announce that those dark times are about to end. A friend of mine (http://www.slr-corp.fr) worked with other people on this project during the summer to bring this functionality to Windows 10. Now let’s see how we can do this.

First download the package here. (md5 : b7ed10bf8b8fbc312a7b35d2ffd0eef3)

Then you have to join Microsoft Insider Program.

When you are part of the insider program. You can now unzip the downloaded package (copy to your local disk) and run Install.cmd as administrator.

At this time you will need to restart your computer. When it’s done, open a PowerShell prompt (as administrator) and change your execution policy (if not already done) to Bypass.

Then, you have to import the PS module, enable deduplication on volume and finally start the job.

You can follow the execution of the job with the command Get-DedupJob and have a status of savedspace and savingsrate with command Get-DedupVolume.

As you can see below, here the concrete result of deduplication. I have a folder with all my Hyper-V machines that normally would take 376 GB but thanks to deduplication, it only takes 81 GB.