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Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V Checkpoints

Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V Checkpoints

Checkpoints enable you to capture point-in-time snapshots of a VM. This gives you an easy method of quickly restoring to a known working configuration, making them useful before installing or updating an application. When a checkpoint is created, the original VHD becomes read-only, and all changes are captured in an AVHD file. Conversely, when a checkpoint is deleted, the contents of the AVHD are merged with the original disk, which becomes the primary writable file.

Prior to Windows Server 2016, the only checkpoint type available was the standard checkpoint, which takes a snapshot of both the disk and the memory state at the time that the checkpoint is taken. But Windows Server 2016 introduces production checkpoints, with uses the Volume Shadows Copy Service on Windows guests or File System Freeze on Linux guests. This enables you to take a consistent snapshot of a VM without the running memory.

Note
Production checkpoints are used by default on Windows Server 2016. And if taking production checkpoint fails, by default the host attempts to create a standard checkpoint.

You can configure the type of checkpoint a VM uses by using the Set-VM cmdlet.

To set the VM to only use production checkpoints, without the ability to fall back to a standard checkpoint, replace the Production option with ProductionOnly.

Note
Checkpoints can also be configured from Hyper-V Manager by editing the settings of a VM.

Perform Remote Management of Hyper-V Hosts

Perform Remote Management of Hyper-V Hosts

Performing remote management of Hyper-V hosts within the same domain simply requires the permissions or delegation discussed in this previous article. However, managing a Hyper-V server that is in a Workgroup is slightly more complicated.

First, the Hyper-V server must have PowerShell remoting enabled. This is easily accomplished by running the Enable-PSRemoting cmdlet.

Note
The network provided on the server must be set to Private. Otherwise, you also need to specify the -SkipNetworkProfileCheck parameter.

The second task on the Hyper-V host is to enable the WSMan credential role as a server. To accomplish this, run the following command:

The more complicated steps occur on the computer from which you plan to manage the Hyper-V. First, you must trust the Hyper-V server from the remote client. If the Hyper-V host is named LAB01, run the following command:

Then still on the remote client, you must also enable the WSMan credential role as a client, and specify the server to manage remotely through this command:

Finally, you will also need to configure the local policy (or a Group policy if you plan to have multiple remote management points on your domain) to allow credentials to be passed.

 

Note
For each of the client settings, TrustedHosts, Delegate Computer, and WSMan, you can use a wildcard mask (*) as a substitute for specifying multiple Hyper-V hosts.

Beginning with Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016, you also have the option to specify different credentials to manage Hyper-V host from Hyper-V Manager. But the above steps must still be taken if the remote host is in a workgroup.

Enable Nested Virtualization on Hyper-V and Windows Server 2016

Enable Nested Virtualization on Hyper-V and Windows Server 2016

As you should know, through the latest version of Hyper-V coming with Windows Server 2016 & Windows 10 you can enable Nested Virtualization, which means you can install Hyper-V role on a Hyper-V virtual machine.

But in order to activate this functionality you need to meet some requirements, otherwise you will face this kind of error.

  • Dynamic Memory must be disabled on the virtual machine containing the nested instance of Hyper-V
  • VM must have more than 1 vCPU
  • MAC address Spoofing must be enabled on the NIC attached to the virtual machine. This setting can be found in the advanced settings under the NIC in the virtual machine’s properties.
  • Virtual Machine version must be 8.0
  • Virtualization Extensions need to be exposed to the VM as seen below.

By default the virtualization extensions setting is disabled. To enable this setting, you have to use this command:

Note
You need to power off the virtual machine to apply most of these settings.

Once all these settings have been applied, you can now install Hyper-V role and features on your virtual machine.

Note
Virtual machines that are being used with nested virtualization no longer support these features:

  • Runtime memory size
  • Dynamic memory
  • Checkpoints
  • Live migration